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20121118
20121118
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
katrina you have a whole bunch of cars taken off the market because they're not usable and all of a sudden used car prices go up, 10, 20, saw the up 20% reported last week d all the way across, diesel oil. we're going to see i across the state it's not just a northeast issue. >> brenda: gary k, what do you think of that? >> toby is absolutely right. whenever you have shortages with an event like this, especially in highly populated area, lumber, building materials, we can run the gamut here. prices go higher and costs go higher to business and consumers and that will definitively effect an economy. especially still trying to get up. a very tough thing to watch. >> brenda: gary b. is it having an impact or limited and temporary? >> the latter brenda, yes. look, it's the less, less temporary and less limited, i think the closer you were to the northeast. so, people obviously on long island, new jersey are going to feel it the most in spikes in prices and people in california feel it less. toby makes a very good point about insurance rates, but i think back to katrina and i did not see, can't
lists of policies and often their wish lists of policies, after hurricane katrina there was a meeting at the heritage foundation just two weeks after the storm hit. parts of the city were still under water and there was a meeting and "the wall street journal" reported from it and the heading was 31 free market solutions for hurricane katrina and you go down the list and it was -- don't re-open the public schools. replace the public schools with vouchers and drill for oil in anwar and the arctic national wild life reserve and what kind of free market solutions are these? here you have a crisis that was created by a collision between heavy weather which may or may not have been linked to climate change and what climate change looks like and colliding with weak infrastructure because of years and years of neglect. let's get rid of the infrastructural together and drill for the oil which is the root cause of climate change. that's their shock doctrine, and i think it's time for people shock. >> people shock? >> which we've had before, if you think about 1929 and the market shock and the w
? please come forward. >> i'm katrina, on the board of the alamo square neighborhood association. i wanted to confirm dennis's comment that we are very supportive of this. we have been following it closely. we are excited we are going to get a new irrigation system and conserve more water and will work closely with community who's communicate what is going on as the various stages happen and make that go more smoothly. we are meeting with the project manager, marvin ye, and talking about how this will affect replanting and tree removal. what we can do to really take our park to the next level. and make good decisions now as this is designed so we can have a beautiful park in 100 years. thank you. >> thank you. >> any other public comment on this item? >> good morning, commissioners. thank you for having this item on your agenda today. my name is gus hernandez, editor of the alamo square news letter. i also want to offer my support for this irrigation plant, long overdue. like commissioner bonia said. you know, we are very excited about . this we are going to be partnering with your departm
of course now they're talking about a bailout for fema, a bailout after katrina and never paid that back and whatever, 16 billion, the post office lost 16 billion. federal housing administration. >> neil: 16 billion. >> that's a common thing, 16 billion, 16 billion, the number later on. >> a combination. >> neil: and after 16, after 16. >> and listen, of course, they have to find places to stay, it was pretty tight, but it doesn't feel right. i use today stay at the soho grand and when i had more money before the first stock market crash and-- >> a very nice place. >> neil: adam, you clearly feel guilty >> well, because in fact, i stayed at the soho grand last month and i have tsay, i didn't think it was that plush, neil, actually and of course they have-- >> plush? >> that's a great place, man. >> and compared so the some of the other hotels at midtown. >> and hilton gardens inns and marriott residence inns and we're piling on fema which of course has problems and needs to be improved. and this is fun. it's a beautiful picture of the hotel. >> neil: you know, it does come at a time they
of hurricane katrina to talk about plans on how to integrate people with disabilities into the emergency plans. and to be part of the mayor's office of disability. and be part of the disability disaster preparedness movement. we have appreciated your leadership, your institutional knowledge. many times over the years as i heard the council hearing cases i see you make that connection to another hearing that was held maybe a year or two before, and seeing the larger picture really of what we are trying to accomplish here in san francisco. i wish you the best with love, with good speed. we hope to hear from you soon. congratulations. >> thank you very much. thank you. >> jewels, i've only known you a few short months. i don't know you as well as i would like. however, i have observed of thing or two. you move through the world with an elegance and style that is impressive. your eloquent and passionate. i listen when you speak i want to thank you for the experience of working with you. >> thank you very much. it means a great deal. >> hi jewels, i've been in the council for four years.
they are clarifying. do you think fema has done a better response with this disaster as it did to katrina, tammy i'll start with you? >> i think years have gone by unlike l.a. earthquakes and there is no warning i think what it shows that a bureaucracy is not going to perform well. we knew this was coming. we knew the first weekend they ran out of the water and unprepared. the people of staten island are still living in a disaster area. they pointed to all the money they spent that is accomplishment. they aren't looking at results. so i don't think this is -- there has been a lot of activity but is the activity actually contributing to making people's lives better wioflt say that the people who are living on staten island and people still without power would not think they are in the best and greatest city of the world and paying the highest taxes in the country. >> given what we have seen in mississippi, i was down there right afterwards, it's a lot better than it was then. i think they actually did do a pretty reasonable job but the issue is what is going to happen in the recovery phase. are the
of hurricane katrina and he says they have a lot to learn. joining us, paul t. conway. good morning, paul. >> good morning, how are you? >> i'm great. a lot of folks on long island are not okay this morning. thousands are still without power. it will be three weeks this tuesday. what exactly could they have done differently? >> i think you hit on the first point, the most important. we're five days from thanksgiving and for the tens of thousands in new york without power our prayers are with them. i would tell folks the most important players on the ground are nongovernment agencies, catholic charts, red cross, team rubicon trying to get lives restore. lipa, after katrina there was extensive national discussion at the state and federal level. the federal government through dhs, you have state governors and local governments trying to apply the lessons of katrina. for lipa, it's unforgivable. last year they had a similar problem and have not applied the principles of preparedness and did not anticipate in advance having utility poles and probably most alarmingly they did not replace a comp
cars, hauling away boats swept into the middle of the street. but as police learned in katrina, starts are prime territory for shady operators to steal cars targeting older models that can be -- we shadowed the new york police auto crime unit, spot checking towers, making sure they're t towing the line. at night it's often easier to get away with illegal tows. >> it's pitch black out here, you can't see anything. it's very dark, they can sneak in and out neighborhoods, grab cars and leave. >> along the way we stop at this spot where tow trucks have dropped off their vehicles. see the markings here? it has to do with the loan company. this car still has water in the health. let's give it a shake so you can see it. >> there's a reason why the insurance company totalled it out. >> for now police are monitoring the lot to make sure that cars don't disappear without reason. authorities seize records of one toein toeing companies. overcharged owners to get them back. after several attempts, we were unable to reach the company for comment. we put a van on it for an suv. >> reporter: no troubl
part of three states. >> we all remember, you know, after hurricane katrina, the fema trailers. do you think fema is doing a better job this time around, and it's just, as you said, because of the normality of the situation that there may be some criticism of the job that fema is doing? >> it's not my job -- my job is to think we always need to do more. and that's what i'm focused on. i think there's some things that have gone incredibly well. for example, the dewatering of the tunnels and the subways. over 475 million gallons of water were removed. i don't think anybody predicted it would be done this fast, given the sheer scale of it. the fema assistance that we've gotten on the ground, we have over half a billion dollars in the hands of survivors. and new york alone. but that's not enough. we know we've got to do more. there's a huge challenge for housing, because of the -- just the lack of available rental and hotel space. >> yeah. mr. burn, our deborah ferric talked to residents on staten island on thursday. let's listen. >> no government agency has shown up here to do anything to
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)